Women are becoming the NFL’s most valuable players

CBS News Report: Women Are Becoming the NFL’s Most Valuable Players:

For the past ten years, Megan Lopresti and her friends have been meeting up every Sunday for one reason.

“I like all the sports, but there’s something about football always just keeps you on your toes.”

Lopresti and her crew are part of a growing demographic for the NFL. Forty-three percent of its fan base is women. And it’s not just the fans.

Last month, the Buffalo Bills made history in hiring the first full-time female coach.

Tracy Wolfson is the lead sideline reporter for CBS Sports.

“Women never got the chance to play football, you just watch it from afar. So it’s intriguing because you don’t really know much about it but you want to be part of it,” said Wolfson.

She’s loved football ever since she wore pigtails.

“I think the NFL has made a big push, whether it’s breast cancer awareness month, whether it’s uniforms … tailored jerseys, pink jerseys, [or] the commercials you see on TV,” Wolfson said of the NFL attracting women.

Madison Avenue is taking note. Last year 54 million women watched the Super Bowl.

“It is big business, yes it is,” said Suzanne Johnson, wife of Jets owner Woody Johnson. She’s a fashion ambassador for the NFL, where women’s merchandise is the fastest growing sector. According to Fanatics, sales have increased more than 20 percent in a year.

“The woman is the glue that holds the whole family together. The woman makes most of the decisions, and that includes purchasing power,” said Johnson.

So while the men may score the winning touchdown this Super Bowl Sunday, women are fast becoming football’s most valuable players.

Latina Entrepreneurs Leading the Way

Latinos are a growing force of influence in America – with good reason. The Latino population is anticipated to double, to approximately 106 million people, by the year 2050. The success of the U.S. economy is very much tied to the success of the Latino workforce. Since small businesses are a critical sector of our economy, ensuring Latinos reach their full entrepreneurial potential is especially important for expanding economic opportunities.

Latinas are leading this charge by starting their own businesses in record numbers. According to the National Women’s Business Council, Latinas own close to 788,000 businesses in the U.S., an impressive 45 percent increase since 2002 and 133 percent increase since 1997. Data shows these businesses generated over $65 billion in revenue in 2012 (the most recent data available), also a huge increase from past decades.

Indeed, Latinas are showing their strength as business leaders both among the general Latino population and among other women. Latina-owned businesses made up almost 35 percent of all Hispanic non-farm businesses across the country. Likewise, Latinas own 36 percent of businesses owned by minority women, and one of every 10 women-owned businesses overall. There’s no doubt Hispanic women, the CEOs of la familia, have serious influence in our economy, their families and communities, and are helping Hispanics grow as an economic force.

One of the most interesting trends among Latina entrepreneurship is the rise of businesses with no paid employees – also called “non-employer businesses.” Over 93 percent of Hispanic women-owned businesses fall in this category. Most of these companies consist of people running small businesses from their homes, such as real estate agents, independent contractors and salespeople. These businesses represent true entrepreneurship.

It’s no surprise that many Latinas have taken to this business model since it provides maximum flexibility and has a low barrier to entry. As such, they are ideal for working mothers, immigrants and those who want to supplement their primary household income. And they harness Latinas’ strong sense of community since these business owners depend on their families and neighbors to help spread the word about their companies. Herbalife is proud to provide such economic opportunities to thousands of Latinas across all 50 U.S. states.

Yet we still have a way to go to ensuring Latinas are able to reach their full economic potential. Hispanic women continue to make just 54 cents for every dollar earned by white non-Hispanic men, a 46 cent pay gap. That’s an even more egregious statistic than the 22 cents pay gap between white women and white non-Hispanic men. Additionally, despite their boom in business ownership, Latinas are underrepresented as CEOs and business executives. We must ensure Latinas have access to the educational and professional development opportunities needed to move up and take on leadership positions.

As a Cuban-American whose family came to the United States seeking a better life, I know first-hand the entrepreneurial spirit and work ethic Latinas bring to the table. In my work at Herbalife, I am continually inspired by the work of our members and their stories of transforming their lives and providing for their families. I’m proud to see my fellow Latinas leading the way and representing the growing population of Hispanic small business owners.

Black Women-Owned Businesses Skyrocket By 322 Percent In Less Than 20 Years

African-American women are the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in America, a new study reveals.

The 2015 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report released this week found that the number of women-owned businesses grew by 74 percent between 1997 and 2015. That’s 1.5 times the national average of business growth to be exact.

Meanwhile, the growth in the number of businesses specifically owned by black women is outpacing that of all women-owned firms, the report says. The number of black women-owned businesses has grown by a whopping 322 percent since 1997. Today, black women own roughly 14 percent of all businesses in the country owned by women, which tallies to around 1.3 million businesses, according to the report.

“While nationally African American women comprise 14% of all women-owned firms, African American women comprise a greater than average share of all women-owned firms in Georgia (35%), Maryland (33%), and Illinois (22%),” the report says.

Statistics show that throughout these 1.3 million companies, nearly 300,000 workers are employed and the businesses generate an estimated $52.6 billion in revenue. When digging into the number of black-owned businesses overall, 49 percent are owned by women.

Businesses owned by black women also top the charts in revenue growth when compared to other minority women-owned firms proving that their economic clout is ever-growing.

African-American women are the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs in America, a new study reveals.

The 2015 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report released this week found that the number of women-owned businesses grew by 74 percent between 1997 and 2015. That’s 1.5 times the national average of business growth to be exact.

Meanwhile, the growth in the number of businesses specifically owned by black women is outpacing that of all women-owned firms, the report says. The number of black women-owned businesses has grown by a whopping 322 percent since 1997. Today, black women own roughly 14 percent of all businesses in the country owned by women, which tallies to around 1.3 million businesses, according to the report.

“While nationally African American women comprise 14% of all women-owned firms, African American women comprise a greater than average share of all women-owned firms in Georgia (35%), Maryland (33%), and Illinois (22%),” the report says.

Statistics show that throughout these 1.3 million companies, nearly 300,000 workers are employed and the businesses generate an estimated $52.6 billion in revenue. When digging into the number of black-owned businesses overall, 49 percent are owned by women.

Businesses owned by black women also top the charts in revenue growth when compared to other minority women-owned firms proving that their economic clout is ever-growing.